What are the characteristics
that are distinct to Indigenous technology?

First Indigenous technologies are recognized as animate,
imbued with the breath of life, they live in form and function
having emerged from the realms of the invisible

Indigenous technologies emerge from the implicate order
to reflect the art of skillful living.  Indigenous technology
is pragmatic.  It is responsive and responsible to the ecology
in which it lives.

Indigenous technologies attract the learning spirit(s)
they provide a learning ecology that supports the revitalization
and transformation of awareness and knowledge.

Indigenous technology is intended to enhance the ability
to maintain and renew balance and harmony
within a multi-dimensional environment.

Indigenous Technology is created within a
sensory environment that builds on our sense of
relationship, meaning, balance, feeling, memory and
place as well as sight, sound, smell,
taste and touch.

Through meaningful interactions Indigenous technology seeks
to engage and evoke significant knowledge and experiences reflective of
the Indigenous world.

Indigenous technologies have the obligation to
come into existence, to be used and to transform
within an ethical space that is responsible
to life in all its forms.

The ability or capacity to make something does not constitute
a valid reason for its existence.
Indigenous technology is coherent with the
natural order.

Indigenous technology has
a different life trajectory than a fax machine.
The Pukea (A carved Polynesian trumpet) will not find itself in a landfill replaced with something sleeker and faster.  It’s efficacy has not
diminished over thousands of years of use.  The Pukea
is an authentic example of technological design coherent with
the natural order

Indigenous technologies have intrinsic value
because we know their ancestry
where they came from, what their place is in our world. 
We know they will transform and pass from this place to
return to the realms of energies.


 

Native IT
Native American Academy
Silver Buffalo